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experiences in israel where she's lived off and on since 2006. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon, welcome. i'm the director here at the hudson institute, a son sore on islam, democracy, and the future of the islam world which publishing a journal on islamism called "current trends in islamic ideology," which i co-edit with my colleagues ambassador haqqani and eric brown. it's my pleasure to host today's event. its subject is a wonderful new book by my guest, lelya gilbert, and here it is. its title is "saturday people, sunday people: israel through the eyes of a christian so jowrner," and ms. gilbert is here to discuss her book with us. before introducing and turning to the book itself, let me say a few words by way of introduction about herself. she has had a very impressive and varied career, much of it concerned with the arts including music. she has been a song writer and worked extensively with musical groups including an african children's chorus based in uganda and based of uganda and orphans. she passed on her gifts two her two sons, colin and dylan. co
-- greeks on the ground. it is midday in london, 2 p.m. in damascus, where syria has accused israel of carrying out an airstrike in its territory. there has been a reaction from bashar al-assad's allies in moscow. the foreign ministry there has condemn the attack. there is mounting concern about the react -- retaliation in israel itself. there are competing accounts of exactly what the targets were. it is thought that israel was trying to prevent the transfer of weapons to hezbollah militants in the area. >> israel has refused to comment on the reported out -- airstrikes. it always does. syrian state tv carried a military statement. the jets came in flying so low they could not be seen by radar. it gave details of what it said happened. syria's official version is that the jets struck a defense research installation northwest of damascus, destroying the building and killing two workers. but earlier reports from diplomats, security officials, and syrian rebels said there was an attack, but the target was a convoy of arms destined for hezbollah militants across the border in lebanon.
is leading israel into more dangerous confrontations with its regional enemies. tensions are high on many fronts. in november, israel responded to rocket fire with a series of air strikes. more than 100 civilians died, most of them palestinian. a cease-fire ended the fighting, but the two sides are still without a viable peace agreement. israel controls the borders. for now, they are allowing goods back in, but the humanitarian situation is dire. hamas is holding fast to its anti-israel's stance. fatah, the internationally recognized representative asking the u.n. to upgrade their international standing. an overwhelming number of nations voted to recognize them as a non-member observer state. they celebrated the news. israel condemned the move. the day after the vote, the government announced the massive settlement plans would move forward. the development would effectively cut the territory in two. united states of the project was "not helpful." tensions over the iranian nuclear program to be most in the spotlight. netanyahu has threatened to launch a preventive strike on iranian nuclear
playing a key role in managing israel's overt campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. now, let get out on the stage the duo who will be arguing against tonight's resolution the world cannot tolerate iran with a nuclear capability vali nasr and fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] vali nasr leads john hopkins school of international study, he is one of the world's top exerts in the political and social developments of iran. he is the author of two best- selling books. he sits on the state department's influential board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're
. yesterday as everyone is talking about election day in israel, no? [ laughter ] election day in israel. we bring you the ongoing coverage of circu-decision 0773 vote -- i guarantee you that killed in park slope. [ laughter ] as you know, israel's incumbent prime minister benjamin netanyahu is awesome. >> the israeli prime minister is committed to the safety and security of the israeli and the jewish people. >> prime minister benjamin netanyahu is say noted hawk. >> a superhawk in israel. >> a very effective leader. >> israel has its own tough guy his name is netanyahu. shalom this, is chuck norris. [ laughter ] >> jon: did not see that coming. that was an advertisement for netanyahu's reelection. what demographic is that targeting? ardent zionists who haven't been to the movies in 30 years? it's hard to imagine an endorsement from anyone that would do the prime minister of israel less good or have a more apparent hairpiece. >> vote for benjamin, terrific guy, terrific leader, great for israel. >> jon: i stand corrected. [ laughter ] of course, the other thing you need to know about benjami
come back, israel had elections. we had interesting results. we'll have in los angeles for israel an interesting conversation from the guy who surprised everyone in the election. >> the cost of living is going up and up, and there is no equality with other parts of israel and society. it's becoming more and more frustrated. flag from 6 to 9 every morning. >> cenk: we're back on "the young turks." we recently had elections in israel, and ben netanyahu was expected to coast to a relatively easy victory. that is not how it turned out. here's what happened ned. >> a sitting prime minister with a second chance acknowledging that voters want to see change. his coalition had more than 40 seats combined before the vote. after the vote, 30-something. israelis showed their desire for change in a way that surprised the pollsters and pundits. they gave the second highest number of votes to a new party just formed last year. >> cenk: netanyahu's party is down to 31 seats because partly the new party that cnn was mentioning has picked up 19 seats. they were just in existence starting last year.
of israel, even though he voted many times to send billions of dollars in u.s. financial aid. >> i will do my best for our country and those i represent at the pentagon, and for all our citizens. a john brenan is a long time administration officials spent 25 years in the cia. >> if confirmed as director, i will make it my mission to ensure that the cia has the tools its needs to keep our nation safe and that its work always reflects the liberties, the freedoms, and the values we hold so dear. >> no brennan. >> but he's controversial. he's been the public face of the administration's defense of the legality of drone strikes, something the president acknowledged. >> he understands we are a nation of laws. in moments of debate and decision, he asked the tough questions and insists on high and rigorous standards. >> four years ago, john brenan had to pull his name from consideration to be cia director because liberals did not think that he had done enough to dissociate himself from the bush administration interrogation policies. now his nomination and that of chuck hagel are going to raise new
will face questions about his support for israel after referring to certain pro-israeli groups as a "jewish lobby" in a 2006 interview. >> i'm a united states senator. not an israeli senator. i'm a united states senator. i support israel. but my first interest is i take an oath of office to the constitution of the united states, not to a president, not to a party, not to israel. in 1988 he called james hormelthen president bill clinton's choice "openly aggressively gay." saying his sexual orientation would be an inhibiting factor. hagel has since apologized for that comment last month saying those remarks were insensitive. but outgoing congressman barney frank blasted him last night in a statement, "i cannot think of any other minority group in the u.s. today where such a negative statement and action made in 1988 would not be an obstacle to a major presidential appointment." t t the two have remained close since. the president has used that alliance as part of his sales pitch for hagel. >> i've served with chuck hagel, i know him. he is a patriot. >> senator jack reid who was also on that
jets bombed the research center near damascus and five more injured. israel has not commented on the allegations, but the israeli government had warned syria this week that it would not accept any syrian weapons falling into the hands of hezbollah. israelis are concerned about the possibility of a chemical weapons attack. people have been stockpiling gas masks for months. >> i would rather actually use it as a warning sign, by which israel is warning both hezbollah and assad that israel is well aware of what is going on. >> israelis fear for their safety. the air strikes marked an escalation in the conflict. now syria says it reserves the right to retaliate. >> in a separate development, the united nations has accused israel of violating the rights of palestinians by continuing to build settlements on occupied land. the united nations human rights council meeting in geneva called israel's settlement building creeping annexation and called on the country to stop the practice and remove all jewish settlers from the west bank. israel is boycotting the meeting as it accuses the co
israel's overt and covert campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. now, let's get out on the stage the equally forbiddable duo who will be orging -- arguing. leading johns hopkins prestigious school. born in tehran one of the world's top experts on the political and social development of iran. and he's the author of two best selling books, the shia revival and democracy on the iran. served as a senior advisor recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, former munk bedator. now, when you think of provocktiff conversation on the big foreign policy challenges of the day you have to think about our next debator. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the "washington post" and is the editor at large of time magazine. his numerous best-selling books include the post american world and the future of freedom. now, we are just moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements once ag
. for our first segment we turn to israel and the occupied territories where israeli forces have begun the year with a spate of killings of unarmed palestinian civilians. so far this month five unarmed civilians have been shot dead by israeli troops. the latest in a was a 21-year- old palestinian woman who was killed when israeli forces opened fire at a west bank school. the witness said she was standing with a group of companions when they came under fire. >> two israeli soldiers traveling in a white car pointed their weapons, shooting indiscriminately at a college where the women were standing at the entrance. there was another man inside. they shot repeople and a large number of soldiers arrived. >> on monday, the israeli human- rights group that some put out a report saying israeli forces had been extensively and systematically violating their own rules of engagement when suppressing protests in the west bank. according to jesselyn, since 2005, at least 48 palestinians have been killed by live ammunition fired at people throwing stones. six more were killed by rubber coated bullets
to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking with the palace. today is a day for israelis to make a choice about their next leaders. no political party has ever gained a majority in israeli elections. so there's expected to be a lot of postturing about what type of government there will be for israel over the next four years. my colleague looks at what is on the ballot box today. >> israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu was cheery this morning as he arrives to vote. by the end of the day he will likely have something more to be chief about. the leader of the party is expected to come out on top and keep his job. but at jerusalem's main market the lack of suspense means there's little fever. they talk about israel being divided and disillusioned. most take it as a give than benjamin netanyahu will remain in office. >> if you ask me, nothing. no b.b., no nothing. >> security, never far from the minds of israelis is what many see as netanyahu's strength. but at least to
. >> woodruff: and a margaret warner report about the threat a nuclear-armed iran poses to israel. >> if they accumulate enough uranium which is close to weapons grade, enough uranium which enables them to detonate one nuclear device: to me is clearly a redline. >> brown: former vice president al gore joins us to talk about his new book as well as money politics and the future of democracy. >> the congress is virtually incapable of passing any reforms unless they first get permission from the powerful special interests. >> woodruff: do americans trust the federal government? andrew kohut says a new pew poll shows the majority do not. >> brown: and ray suarez gets the latest on the chinese hackers who allegedly mounted a four-month cyber-attack against the "new york times." that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy
to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world. >> i believe, and always have, that america must engage, not retreat, in the world, but engage in the world. my record is consistent on these points. >> woodruff: but as a nebraska senator, in 2007, hagel angered fellow republicans when he opposed the surge of u.s. troops into iraq. today, his former close friend, arizona senator john mccain made clear, they haven't forgotten. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous. >> are you going to answer the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like an answer on whether you were right or wrong, then you're free to
. researchers blamed a rise in temperature for what they call an unprecedented retreat. now come to israel, where talks are already underway about building a new coalition government. put they's ballot alliance led by benjamin netanyahu -- and left him in a substantially weaker position. there is a young, centrist party. we have this report from jerusalem. >> thrusting himself and his centrist party onto center stage. after a long night, about his probable role in the coalition government, a potential newcomer, he told the bbc before the election exactly what he stands for. >> somebody has to be the voice of the middle class. there is a dispute with the palestinians. we came into the political arena to become that voice. >> benjamin netanyahu is expected to bring him into a new, broad government. the government was weakened by yesterday's vote, but net non remains prime minister. he is being urged to put together as broad coalition as possible, reflecting the day-to- day concerns of the secular is really is. perhaps, some of the ultra- orthodox religious parties and recent governments. aft
israel margaret warner reports on fears of islamic militants and chemical weapons just overr thee border. >> warner: with conflict raging inside syria, israel's taking no chances. it's now fortifying the security barrier behind me to guard against any dangers that may arise. >> ifill: and from mali, lindsay hilsum has a story of celebration as french and local forces push north to capture two key towns. >> reporter: look at these people. just thrilled because they can dance. they can sing. the women can ride motor bikes. they can do all the things they haven't been able to do for the last nine months while the jihadis have been in power. >> woodruff: we close with a new edition of the daily download. tonight, can your facebook postings get you fired? >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by moving our economfor 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connec us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the o
israel margaret warner reports on fears of islamic militants and chemical weapons just over the border. >> warner: with conflict raging inside syria israel's taking no chances. it's now fortifying the security barrier behind me to guard against any dangers that may arise. >> ifill: and from mali lindsay hilsum has a story of celebration as french and local forces push north to capture two key towns. >> reporter: look at these people. just thrilled because they can dance. they can sing. the women can ride motor bikes. they can do all the things they haven't been able to do for the last nine months while the jihadis have been in power. >> woodruff: we close with a new edition of the daily download. tonight, can your facebook postings get you fired? >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the
with the financial times, thanks so much for talking to us. >> ifill: next, to israel. president obama called prime minister benjamin netanyahu today to congratulate him on his victory in last week's parliamentary elections. the two leaders spoke about ensuring security in the region at a time of growing tensions. with their elections behind them, both men plan to address the civil war in syria, the threat posed by iran's nuclear program, and the stalemate between israelis and palestinians. and those are the subjects of three stories this week from margaret warner who is on a reporting trip to israel, the west bank and gaza. she begins tonight reporting on israeli concerns about the conflict in nearby syria. >> warner: the sweeping vistas of the golan heights plateau and the bucolic life of the israelis who live here bear quiet witness to the strategic importance of this area which israel captured from syria during the 1967 arab-israeli war. but after four decades of quiet along this border, israel, just like syria's arab neighbors, is increasingly worried about the unpredictable spillover from the
because i don't think it's in the interest of israel. i just don't think it's smart for israel." guest: i have no way of knowing and i doubt that hagel is anti- semitic. the most troubling part of that has to do with the fact that he goes on to say, i am u.s. senator, i am not the senator from israel. the troubling part of that is the subtle suggestion that if you disagree with him about u.s. policies towards israel and the middle east, there is a loyalty question at stake. i think that's going to be something the senators are going to ask him about. >> in the "washington post," he says, by congressional standards, senator hagel is quite independent of israel. guest: he has always voted in favor of those aid packages. this is a complex and often taboo subject. karen david miller was a negotiator for -- aaron david miller was a negotiator. people can actually go and listen to the various recordings he did on u.s., israel issues. we have evolved -- it is a complicated issue. many people have tried to discuss it. it is a question of, what are israel's interests. there's a legitimate debate t
in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the count h moved dramically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american nsulate in benghazi, libya. four amerins we killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat se
in the region who all border syria, turkey, jordan, israel, also lebanon. and the potential for a sectarian divide between shiites and sunnis that could spread from syria, exacerbate the tensions that are already there in iraq and then down to the gulf. >> you have the arab revolution's lead to now the rise of these islamist authoritarian governments. what are the consequences of that? in syria you talk about al qaeda presence. it's unlikely an al qaeda affiliated group will take over syria or egypt. greater likelihood perhaps in egypt and not even there. what is american influence look like -- what should it look like in this post revolutionary period when there was so much excitement about the prospect of egyptian democracy taking root in way that would be in concert with the u.s. at a time when there are people very critical of the o bama administration for essentially getting out of the way, letting the revolution happen and then turning their backs on the likes of mubarak who could have at least guaranteed some level of stability? >> i think it was an illusion to imagine that we could
and experience to tackle israel's many problems. rejecting criticism from home and overseas, he is taking israel down a dangerous confrontational path. mr. netanyahu has authorized even more building in the settlements. there has been no progress in the peace talks with palestinians. the prime minister could isolate israel even further. >> if they often form a government with the extreme right wing and the ultra religious, this is a government that will call -- with the european union, a clash with the obama administration and will not curry favor with the israeli public. this kind of government might not survive. >> this party led by a formal journalist could now play a role in a more modern government. another newcomer is shaking israel's political landscape. >> benjamin netanyahu has taken this page -- taken the stage. let's listen. >> that was the whole of israeli citizens. i'm hoping to leave these changes and for this purpose, we ought to create a wide as possible government. i started this task already this evening. the government that will be created will be based on the following princi
and we will prevent any attacks for hezbollah to smuggle such weapons from syria. is israel attacks, it means that such an attempt by hezbollah was made. >> the contagion from the violence in syria worries the whole region. syria sits on the middle east religious and political fault lines. they connect the war to all of its neighbors, whether they like it or not. the war in syria is exporting trouble. its neighbors are seeing a new threats to their security as a result of the slow collapse of the syrian state. this time, israel felt threatened but all of the country sharing borders and some further afield have seen rising tensions and in some places, bloodshed because of the war. international diplomacy is deadlocked. >> that there has been problems in the turkish border in recent weeks. there are huge flows of refugees over the jordanian border. many tensions in iraq at the moment. lebanon, many connections to syria. the longer this crisis goes on, the more people that it affects, the greater the danger. >> in syria, the victims of the latest massacre at aleppo have been buried. sy
will also be confirmed, although that's a bigger fight, and his remarks about israel that somehow he isn't tough enough on israel, his objection to sanctions was that they were unilateral. he now supports the current sanctions. he is certainly not antiisrael. those arguments will be put aside. he is there to cut the budget, and he's the man for the moment. he has the appetite to do that. >> so this prospective appointment is bypassing wall street. is that good play by obama? >> well, in the first four years of the -- of his administration, the first term, his great job was to keep the financial sector from collapsing. so he had someone intimately familiar in tim geithner with wall street. in the second four years his great job is balancing fiscal issues, and he has in jack lew somebody who, as eleanor said, knows the budget up and down, tremendous respect, a great negotiator. keep in mind, jack lew is something that people don't understand. he is a liberal fiscal hawk. he's a liberal deficit hawk. he's got very strong views on the safety net and funding of government but he really does b
of the coming death, burial and resurrection of israel's messiah. "he was the priest of (jehovah? no it doesn't say that? but what?) the most high god." now we have to realize there is only one god in scripture but there are many names for him and that confuses people. but you see, we have all these different names of god to signify a particular role in his being god. in his attributes. and so for example, when abraham was going to sacrifice isaac and god withheld him. what was in the thicket behind him? well, the ram! who put it there? god did! and i always emphasize, you see, that ram was a wild ram. he was already three days journey from where he lived, so it was not a household pet like somebody tried to tell me one time. he was three days journey from home, so that ram in the thicket was not the family pet, it was a wild one. but, did abraham and isaac have any trouble getting that animal on the altar? none. why? it was provided and it was docile. and it was a willing sacrifice. they didn't have to struggle with it and consequently what did abraham call the place? jehovah-jireh which sim
minr of israel. mr. prime minister, welcome. nice to see you. long time no see. what was your reaction when you heard morsi's hateful words? >> well, good evening. i think these are certainly obnoxious expressions. it's certainly raising serious questions about the attitude of this person. i hope that while he's now president of egypt that he will understand the responsibility of this part of his job and the effect that this has on relations between israel and egypt and he has to adjust himself to the realities of the relations that existed for the last 30 years between israel and egypt. >> his statements were ugly, his tone ugly, the words he chose to use anti-semitic and racist, and yet they show a great frustration with the israeli-arab peace, the status of the two-state negotiations. it appears, doesn't it to you, prime minister, that we get further and further away from mid yeast peace with every day, every week, every month, every year that passes? >> nothing that develops -- or that does not develop in the context of the relations between israel and the palestinians justifies wh
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,432 (some duplicates have been removed)